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CIO and IT Newsletter

Participate in Salary Survey 

IT Salary Survey
  If you provide us with one data point we will send you the summary as soon as the survey is released.  If you provide us with ten (10) or more data points we will send you a full copy of the survey. 


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Security Policies & Procedures
Most enterprises face data security breaches because of lost or stolen laptops, PDAs, SmartPhones, and USB storage devices.  Industry experts have found that:  

  • Laptop and mobile device theft is experienced by 50% of security professionals
  • Every 50 seconds a laptop goes missing - and that is just at U.S. airports
  • 85% of privacy and security professionals had at least one reportable breach in the past 12 months
  • The cost of recovering from a single data breach now averages $6.3 million
  • 66% of data breaches involved data the victim did not know was on the system. 


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IT Job DescriptionsTips to Give Those Looking for jobs

With the amount of IT staff turnover, many of your friends and peers are looking jobs. Here are some suggestions that you can give them on how to write a killer resume. As you know it is not unusual for an IT recruiter to have a stack of over 200 resumes to look at. The challenge that you face is how do you make your resume stand out so you are called for an interview. This is what we have found that works.

  • Keep it short - The typically recruiter only spend about 10 to 15 seconds on their first pass through review.  If your resume is 4 to 5 pages long recruiters often do not get past the first page.  Keep it short.
  • State what your objective is - When the recruiter reviews the resume if he sees that your objective is the same one that he is trying to fill that is plus for you.  At the same time, he may have a second position that needs to be filled and could move you into that stack.
  • Highlight your current skills - No one really is hired because they leaned a programming language in college.  Rather they are hired because they implemented a Web 2.0 application or some other current technology. Keep your resume current.
  • Minimize the number of Acronyms - Acronyms say nothing about what you know, rather spend the limited space that you have in a resume to show how you have been able to apply a technology to business solution. For example instead of saying that, you worked on an ITSM provide and example of how your actions improved the service a key customer received and then resulted in more revenue for your company. That is not to say that acronyms and protocols should not be mentioned at all. However, if you do, be prepared to back it up.
  • Present practical facts not theory - Recruiters are interested in what could be and should be.  They want to hire IT professionals who can get things done now.  In addition, do not use buzzwords if you do not know what they mean.  If you use the term Sarbanes-Oxley, know what it means and how you can help the recruiter's organization meet its compliance objectives.
  • Define a broad scope for the position - When a recruiter sees a resume that is limited or single dimensional they often reject the resume.  If on the other hand the scope is broad, they move the resume to the keep pile or the other position they are recruiting for.
  • Be specific about your experience - Try to avoid words like "assisted" and "supported", they mean nothing.  What the recruiter is looking for is what you personally actually did.  This is the age customization, match the experience to the position you are applying for, even if it means some repetition.
  • Focus the resume on getting the interview - The resume should be directed to an IT professional. Yes, human resources may review the application as well, but ultimately the position's supervisor (and peers) will choose whom to interview. Your resume should speak to them. 

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